Aug 2009

The Rise of Field Monitors


I’ve recently spent a lot of time evaluating our production processes looking for ways to improve efficiency.  There were two motivating factors.  First, we’ve pretty much abandoned Standard Definition production, relegating it only to live web events where we are streaming the content or where the client demands it.  Second, I was working on a new book, Video Made on a Mac: Production and Postproduction Using Apple Final Cut Studio and Adobe Creative Suite with Robbie Carman.  In it we try to evaluate ways to efficiently integrate Apple and Adobe software into best practices for production and post.

We discovered a lot along the way, in particular that “field” monitors have taken on a whole new life of usefulness. Here are a few of the things we discovered in the last few months of HD production.

Read the article at ProVideoCoalition.com
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How to Keep Your Body Happy When Chained to a Computer

This article was originally written for inclusion in the first edition of Photoshop for Video. I present it here as I think the information is important (despite the publisher cutting it).


by Dave A. Anselmi
You all know the feeling—that annoying “nag” in your wrists, that stinging or “tingling” feeling down your forearms, perhaps that aching pain in your shoulders and neck. At first it was a minor annoyance… and now, sometimes you find yourself “rushing” your edits, or perhaps even not editing at all, because of the pain.

You’re not alone. As more and more people become “knowledge workers”, doctors and therapists are seeing more and more cases of Computer-Related Repetitive Stress Injuries (RSI), or colloquially, “Carpal Tunnel Syndrome” (CTS). And Non-Linear Editors are especially susceptible, what with their long hours sitting in the dark, ‘hunched’ over a keyboard, moving the mouse back and forth.
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The Case for Ergonomics


Here I’ve gone and given you all sorts of things to try with your computer. I would feel guilty if I didn’t bring up ergonomics. The goal behind ergonomics is to design the work to best fit the worker. Highly repetitive tasks are prone cause physical problems. The goal is to prevent back injuries, carpal tunnel syndrome, tendonitis, and other musculoskeletal disorders.

How serious is the problem? Very. According to the U.S. department of Labor, approximately one-third of all occupational injuries are directly tied to over-exertion and repetitive motion. These injuries
cost employers over $20 billion in worker compensation each year.

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